I am a young brilliant confused soul, wanting to suck the marrow out of life.

Who are you?

 

accras:


Marsha Hunt photographed by Araldo di Crollalanza in 1968

Queen

accras:

Marsha Hunt photographed by Araldo di Crollalanza in 1968

Queen

(Source: ohso60s)

unhistorical:

Interviewer: But the question is more, how do you get there? Do you get there by confrontation, violence?

Davis: Oh, is that the question you were asking? Yeah see, that’s another thing. When you talk about a revolution, most people think violence, without realizing that the real content of any revolutionary thrust lies in the principles and the goals that you’re striving for, not in the way you reach them. On the other hand, because of the way this society’s organized, because of the violence that exists on the surface everywhere, you have to expect that there are going to be such explosions. You have to expect things like that as reactions. If you are a black person and live in the black community all your life and walk out on the street everyday seeing white policemen surrounding you… when I was living in Los Angeles, for instance, long before the situation in L.A ever occurred, I was constantly stopped. No, the police didn’t know who I was. But I was a black women and I had a natural and they, I suppose thought I might be “militant.”

And when you live under a situation like that constantly, and then you ask me, you know, whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all. Whether I approve of guns.

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs, bombs that were planted by racists. I remember, from the time I was very small, I remember the sounds of bombs exploding across the street. Our house shaking. I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times, because of the fact that, at any moment, we might expect to be attacked. The man who was, at that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bull Connor, would often get on the radio and make statements like, “Niggers have moved into a white neighborhood. We better expect some bloodshed tonight.” And sure enough, there would be bloodshed. After the four young girls who lived, one of them lived next door to me…I was very good friends with the sister of another one. My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class. My mother—in fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of one of the young girls called my mother and said, “Can you take me down to the church to pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.” And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place. And then, after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again.

Angela Davis on violence and revolution (1972)

ripspaddedroom:

locsgirl:

thinksquad:

When all other Seminole, Texas students were headed to their first day of school on Monday, one little boy was sent home because his hair was too long. The five-year-old boy, Malachi Wilson, is a part of the Navajo Nation, and according to his parents, it’s against their religion to cut his hair. CBS 7’s Lauren Lanmon reports.

The district says they were only following procedure and after proper documentation was shown that he was truly Native American, he was allowed to register. But his mother says even though he is in school now, they’ll never get back their first day of Kindergarten.

“Malachi was excited to start school all summer long. After we had enrolled him he was excited, everyday it was the question, ‘mom, are we going to school?’” said Malachi’s mother, April Wilson.

Excited about his first day of school, Malachi walked into the doors of F.J. Young Elementary only to be told he couldn’t attend because his hair was too long.

“Our hair is sacred to us, it makes us part of who we are,” said April.

“I trim it, it grows back,” said Malachi.

Malachi has a certificate in blood from the Navajo Nation stating he is at least one half Native American.

“He’s more native on his dad’s side than on mine,” said April.

After leaving the school, Malachi’s mother contacted the Navajo Nation, and by the end of the school day, the school district approved his documentation and Malachi was enrolled. “I also spoke with the American Indian movement; they had also contacted the superintendent. When they contacted the superintendent, they had told them that they were going to accept Malachi into school.”

School district officials say they followed procedure “one hundred percent”, pointing to a page in the district handbook that states, “certain recognized religious or spiritual beliefs may qualify for an exception from provisions of the dress code.” The handbook goes on to say that with proper documentation all students are allowed. But even though Malachi is now enrolled, his mom is still bothered by their first day of school encounter.

“It’s kind of heartbreaking because - how do you explain to a five-year-old that he is being turned away because of what he believes in, because of his religion, because of what’s part of him - how do you explain that to him?” said April.

April says after yesterday’s events, she has even thought about taking him out of public school adding she still plans on finding a lawyer to talk about the possibility of a discrimination case.
More than 100,000 of the nearly 300,000 members of the Navajo Nation live in New Mexico. There have been incidents dating back to the late-19th century in which people have forced Navajo schoolchildren to cut their hair, something forbidden the Nation’s culture.

http://www.kob.com/article/stories/S3544539.shtml#.VABjOfmwI3b

So the only reason they even consider allowing people to wear their hair how they want is because of religion, which is bs.


that lil dude hair is not gonna stop him from learning a bitch ass thang… I hate dumb rules